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Home >> T >> Tablets >> Waterfi Waterproofed Kindle Paperwhite review: A good e-reader that’s totally stable from H2O damage

Waterfi Waterproofed Kindle Paperwhite review: A good e-reader that’s totally stable from H2O damage

If waterproof is high on your checklist of e-reader must-haves, we suggest that many people cruise a Kobo Aura H20. It’s a able e-book reader designed to mount adult to a occasional poolside dash or even an extended soak in a prohibited tub. For anyone already invested in Amazon’s endless collection of DRM-protected e-books, periodicals and comic books, however, investing in another company’s exclusive hardware could be a reduction than appealing proposition.

If we tumble into this latter organisation of readers, you’ll be happy to know that a waterproof chronicle of Amazon’s Kindle Paperwhite can be had, supposing you’re prepared to compensate by a nose for it.

For $230 ($110 above Amazon’s standard pricing,) Waterfi will see we set adult with a third-generation Kindle Paperwhite which, by a exclusive process, has been waterproofed and tested for use in inlet adult to 210 feet. If that’s too abounding for your blood, Waterfi will also request a waterproofing diagnosis a first, second or third-generation Kindle that we already own. Just give them $99, and a cost of shipping. In a few weeks, your Kindle will be behind prepared to take a thrust during your subsequent pool party.  The association stands behind their waterproofing with a one-year warranty.

How does it work?

As a reading device, a Waterfi-treated third-generation Kindle Paperwhite looks and operates in a same demeanour as a batch square of Amazon’s hardware does (for sum on this, check out our examination of a Kindle Paperwhite. The pretreated chronicle Waterfi sells includes Amazon’s “special offers” substitution for promotion on a screensaver and home screen.)

I couldn’t detect any disproportion in functionality: a arrangement was only as crisp, page turns and other on-screen interactions with both inclination were clearly identical. And even yet Waterfi pressed their treated Kindle full of a H2O and corrosion-proofing material, we couldn’t discern any disproportion in weight between theirs and an untreated Paperwhite.

How a treated Kindle functions when it’s in a H2O is a opposite story.

Waterfi claims that their waterproofing routine protects wiring from humidity, chlorine, feverishness and liquids. So, to exam their treated Kindle, we took it for a thirty-minute soak in a prohibited tub. Pulling it out of a hot, chemically treated water, we found that a Waterfi-treated Paperwhite still worked, switching behind on as if it were bone dry. That’s a win. But excellence of a device’s survivability was dampened by a fact that a H2O on a arrangement caused a Paperwhite’s UI to secretly register a flurry of input: pages incited on their own, complement settings were changed, and bookmarks that I’m still operative to mislay were created.

Admittedly, a Kobo H2O would humour from a same problem, though it was designed from a get-go to be used around water. When that e-reader senses H2O on a display, it throws adult a prompt to clean it dry, and thatch all submit until we do so.

Waterfi Waterproofed Kindle Paperwhite review: A good e-reader that’s totally stable from H2O damage

If waterproof is high on your checklist of e-reader must-haves, we suggest that many people cruise a Kobo Aura H20. It’s a able e-book reader designed to mount adult to a occasional poolside dash or even an extended soak in a prohibited tub. For anyone already invested in Amazon’s endless collection of DRM-protected e-books, periodicals and comic books, however, investing in another company’s exclusive hardware could be a reduction than appealing proposition.

If we tumble into this latter organisation of readers, you’ll be happy to know that a waterproof chronicle of Amazon’s Kindle Paperwhite can be had, supposing you’re prepared to compensate by a nose for it.

For $230 ($110 above Amazon’s standard pricing,) Waterfi will see we set adult with a third-generation Kindle Paperwhite which, by a exclusive process, has been waterproofed and tested for use in inlet adult to 210 feet. If that’s too abounding for your blood, Waterfi will also request a waterproofing diagnosis a first, second or third-generation Kindle that we already own. Just give them $99, and a cost of shipping. In a few weeks, your Kindle will be behind prepared to take a thrust during your subsequent pool party.  The association stands behind their waterproofing with a one-year warranty.

How does it work?

As a reading device, a Waterfi-treated third-generation Kindle Paperwhite looks and operates in a same demeanour as a batch square of Amazon’s hardware does (for sum on this, check out our examination of a Kindle Paperwhite. The pretreated chronicle Waterfi sells includes Amazon’s “special offers” substitution for promotion on a screensaver and home screen.)

I couldn’t detect any disproportion in functionality: a arrangement was only as crisp, page turns and other on-screen interactions with both inclination were clearly identical. And even yet Waterfi pressed their treated Kindle full of a H2O and corrosion-proofing material, we couldn’t discern any disproportion in weight between theirs and an untreated Paperwhite.

How a treated Kindle functions when it’s in a H2O is a opposite story.

Waterfi claims that their waterproofing routine protects wiring from humidity, chlorine, feverishness and liquids. So, to exam their treated Kindle, we took it for a thirty-minute soak in a prohibited tub. Pulling it out of a hot, chemically treated water, we found that a Waterfi-treated Paperwhite still worked, switching behind on as if it were bone dry. That’s a win. But excellence of a device’s survivability was dampened by a fact that a H2O on a arrangement caused a Paperwhite’s UI to secretly register a flurry of input: pages incited on their own, complement settings were changed, and bookmarks that I’m still operative to mislay were created.

Admittedly, a Kobo H2O would humour from a same problem, though it was designed from a get-go to be used around water. When that e-reader senses H2O on a display, it throws adult a prompt to clean it dry, and thatch all submit until we do so.