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Apple admits iPhone X rear camera issues can cause Face ID borkage

APPLE HAS ADMITTED that problems with the iPhone X’s rear camera could be causing Face ID to go titsup. 

In a new support document sent to retail stores and Authorized Service Providers over the weekend, Apple is advising employees to run an Apple Services Toolkit 2 (AST2) diagnostics test on iPhone X handsets to see if the device’s Face ID issues could be resolved with a rear camera repair.

“In order to provide the best customer experience, if a customer reports that their iPhone X is having Face ID issues, you may be able to resolve the issue with a rear camera repair,” the document reads.

If that doesn’t turn out to be the case, the employee should simply perform a whole unit replacement, 9to5Mac, which obtained the support document, reports. 

While replacing the iPhone X’s rear camera to fix Face ID might seem nonsensical, users of Apple’s pricey flagship have taken to Reddit to report that when their main camera goes to Borksville, so does Apple’s face unlocking tech.

“Pano, slow-mo, and time-lapse work for the rear camera but everything else does not. The front-facing camera works perfectly. But when I try to setup Face ID it says, ‘Face ID is not available try again later’,” Reddit user ‘Razerx1’ moaned. 

Related: Apple’s Face ID tech can’t tell two Chinese women apart

This disgruntled iPhone user went on to say that they’re device was ultimately replaced with spanking-new iPhone X, with the Genius Bar employee explaining that the True Depth camera and telephoto camera lens are connected:

“I was talking to the Genius Bar guy and he said that the cameras are connected. The lenses differ on what they do. The wide angle did the ones that worked and is connected to the front-facing camera. The telephoto is connected to the true depth and was not working.”

News of Apple’s updated repair guidelines, which the firm has yet to formally comment on, comes just days after a BBC Watchdog investigation found that the company is attempting to profit from its iPhone battery replacement initiative by forcing customers to pay for unnecessary repairs. µ

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