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​Here’s what happens to CoreOS now that Red Hat owns it

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Integrating a Hybrid Cloud


Integrating a Hybrid Cloud

As distant and quick as cloud computing is embedding itself into a enterprise, there sojourn many cloud-resistant applications and services.

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One of a biggest questions during Red Hat Summit in San Francisco was “What will Red Hat be doing with a new CoreOS acquisition?” Now we know. In a presentation, Ben Breard, Red Hat product manager for Linux Containers, and Brandon Philips, CTO of CoreOS, explained where CoreOS offerings are going now that a association is partial of Red Hat.

Red Hat will be integrating CoreOS Tectonic, a Kubernetes distribution; Quay, a craving enclosure registry; and Container Linux, a lightweight cluster Linux distribution, into Red Hat’s enclosure and Kubernetes-based program portfolio. One renouned CoreOS record won’t be creation a trip: The rkt enclosure standard. Instead, it will spin a community-supported enclosure technology.

Container Linux and Project Atomic, that is built around a lightweight containerized handling system, Atomic Host, will be joined into Red Hat CoreOS. Breard said, “Red Hat CoreOS will safety a best from both offerings.” Ultimately, Red Hat CoreOS will substitute Atomic Host and Container Linux and duty as Red Hat’s immutable, container-centric handling system.

There will be an upstream village chronicle of CoreOS, as Fedora is to Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), though that’s still a work in progress. The Project Atomic site will eventually be phased away, though it won’t be a thespian move. The formula itself will live on in Red Hat’s enclosure formula repos.

Red Hat CoreOS will yield a new substructure for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP), Red Hat OpenShift Online, and Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated for business who cite an permanent infrastructure-based Kubernetes height with programmed updates. RHOCP will also continue to support RHEL, for business who cite a normal lifecycle and wrapping as a substructure for their Kubernetes deployments.

CoreOS’s recover intonation will be tied to OpenShift’s recover cycle. They will be in lock-step sync with any other. It will be targeting cloud and virtualization environments. Eventually, it will be shipped on unclothed metal, though that’s a proceed off.

Container Linux will also continue on for now as a Linux distro. It will yield a free, fast-moving, and programmed enclosure horde while also providing calm options from a RHEL and Fedora.

Red Hat will confederate Tectonic into RHOCP. In particular, this will embody Tectonic’s ability to conduct vast Kubernetes clusters around programmed “over-the-air” updates. With this feature, systems administrators and IT managers can simply hurl out upgrades to whole Tectonic clusters and underlying Container Linux hosts all around an programmed process. Moving ahead, this capability will be famous as programmed operations.

With programmed operations, IT teams will be means to use a programmed upgrades of Tectonic interconnected with a reliability, support, and endless focus growth capabilities of RHOCP. The finish outcome will make handling Kubernetes deployments during scale easier. Most rote upkeep tasks will be achieved automatically. This will diminution a need for consistent director movement and yield a “lights out” proceed to cluster oversight.

Red Hat promises Tectonic and Container Linux will assistance expostulate automation during each covering of a cloud-native stack. This automation will extend to Red Hat’s strong eccentric program businessman (ISV) ecosystem. This in spin will concede ISVs to broach and say applications and services on tip of RHOCP hybrid clouds.

CoreOS Kubernetes Operator application-specific controllers, that extend a Kubernetes API to create, configure, and conduct instances of formidable stateful applications, will live on. It takes a “human knowledge” of handling a Kubernetes focus and builds it into software, creation typically severe Kubernetes workloads easier to muster and maintain.

This Operator Framework open source project will be used in RHOCP to assistance Red Hat ISV’s build complex, Kubernetes stateful applications. The idea is to emanate services that “just work” opposite any Kubernetes-enabled cloud.

Quay, a heading enclosure registry, becomes Red Hat Quay. It will spin a basement for new Red Hat handling complement projects. Other CoreOS open-source projects including etcd, Ignition, dex, Clair, Operators, and some-more will continue underneath Red Hat’s guidance.

Over a past few years, many Red Hat OpenShift business had already started regulating CoreOS Quay as their craving registry solution. While OpenShift provides an integrated enclosure registry, business who need some-more extensive craving class registry capabilities now have a choice to get Quay Enterprise and Quay.io from Red Hat. Quay includes programmed geographic replication, integrated confidence scanning with Clair, picture time appurtenance for observation history, rollback support, programmed pruning, and more. Quay will be accessible both as an craving program resolution and as a hosted use during Quay.io.

Tectonic’s programmed operations, CoreOS, and some-more will be entirely integrated into Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform in destiny versions. Container Linux will continue to be confirmed while a inheritor is being grown with a Fedora and CoreOS Communities. Red Hat Quay is accessible today.

As for CoreOS’s existent customers? Breard promises that “No users or communities will be left behind.”

Related Stories:

​Here’s what happens to CoreOS now that Red Hat owns it

special feature


Integrating a Hybrid Cloud


Integrating a Hybrid Cloud

As distant and quick as cloud computing is embedding itself into a enterprise, there sojourn many cloud-resistant applications and services.

Read More

One of a biggest questions during Red Hat Summit in San Francisco was “What will Red Hat be doing with a new CoreOS acquisition?” Now we know. In a presentation, Ben Breard, Red Hat product manager for Linux Containers, and Brandon Philips, CTO of CoreOS, explained where CoreOS offerings are going now that a association is partial of Red Hat.

Red Hat will be integrating CoreOS Tectonic, a Kubernetes distribution; Quay, a craving enclosure registry; and Container Linux, a lightweight cluster Linux distribution, into Red Hat’s enclosure and Kubernetes-based program portfolio. One renouned CoreOS record won’t be creation a trip: The rkt enclosure standard. Instead, it will spin a community-supported enclosure technology.

Container Linux and Project Atomic, that is built around a lightweight containerized handling system, Atomic Host, will be joined into Red Hat CoreOS. Breard said, “Red Hat CoreOS will safety a best from both offerings.” Ultimately, Red Hat CoreOS will substitute Atomic Host and Container Linux and duty as Red Hat’s immutable, container-centric handling system.

There will be an upstream village chronicle of CoreOS, as Fedora is to Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), though that’s still a work in progress. The Project Atomic site will eventually be phased away, though it won’t be a thespian move. The formula itself will live on in Red Hat’s enclosure formula repos.

Red Hat CoreOS will yield a new substructure for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (RHOCP), Red Hat OpenShift Online, and Red Hat OpenShift Dedicated for business who cite an permanent infrastructure-based Kubernetes height with programmed updates. RHOCP will also continue to support RHEL, for business who cite a normal lifecycle and wrapping as a substructure for their Kubernetes deployments.

CoreOS’s recover intonation will be tied to OpenShift’s recover cycle. They will be in lock-step sync with any other. It will be targeting cloud and virtualization environments. Eventually, it will be shipped on unclothed metal, though that’s a proceed off.

Container Linux will also continue on for now as a Linux distro. It will yield a free, fast-moving, and programmed enclosure horde while also providing calm options from a RHEL and Fedora.

Red Hat will confederate Tectonic into RHOCP. In particular, this will embody Tectonic’s ability to conduct vast Kubernetes clusters around programmed “over-the-air” updates. With this feature, systems administrators and IT managers can simply hurl out upgrades to whole Tectonic clusters and underlying Container Linux hosts all around an programmed process. Moving ahead, this capability will be famous as programmed operations.

With programmed operations, IT teams will be means to use a programmed upgrades of Tectonic interconnected with a reliability, support, and endless focus growth capabilities of RHOCP. The finish outcome will make handling Kubernetes deployments during scale easier. Most rote upkeep tasks will be achieved automatically. This will diminution a need for consistent director movement and yield a “lights out” proceed to cluster oversight.

Red Hat promises Tectonic and Container Linux will assistance expostulate automation during each covering of a cloud-native stack. This automation will extend to Red Hat’s strong eccentric program businessman (ISV) ecosystem. This in spin will concede ISVs to broach and say applications and services on tip of RHOCP hybrid clouds.

CoreOS Kubernetes Operator application-specific controllers, that extend a Kubernetes API to create, configure, and conduct instances of formidable stateful applications, will live on. It takes a “human knowledge” of handling a Kubernetes focus and builds it into software, creation typically severe Kubernetes workloads easier to muster and maintain.

This Operator Framework open source project will be used in RHOCP to assistance Red Hat ISV’s build complex, Kubernetes stateful applications. The idea is to emanate services that “just work” opposite any Kubernetes-enabled cloud.

Quay, a heading enclosure registry, becomes Red Hat Quay. It will spin a basement for new Red Hat handling complement projects. Other CoreOS open-source projects including etcd, Ignition, dex, Clair, Operators, and some-more will continue underneath Red Hat’s guidance.

Over a past few years, many Red Hat OpenShift business had already started regulating CoreOS Quay as their craving registry solution. While OpenShift provides an integrated enclosure registry, business who need some-more extensive craving class registry capabilities now have a choice to get Quay Enterprise and Quay.io from Red Hat. Quay includes programmed geographic replication, integrated confidence scanning with Clair, picture time appurtenance for observation history, rollback support, programmed pruning, and more. Quay will be accessible both as an craving program resolution and as a hosted use during Quay.io.

Tectonic’s programmed operations, CoreOS, and some-more will be entirely integrated into Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform in destiny versions. Container Linux will continue to be confirmed while a inheritor is being grown with a Fedora and CoreOS Communities. Red Hat Quay is accessible today.

As for CoreOS’s existent customers? Breard promises that “No users or communities will be left behind.”

Related Stories:

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